Revolutionary Measures

Spam goes social

No-spam

Most of us are painfully aware of the amount of email spam out there. According to Kaspersky Lab, 70% of emails sent in Q2 2013 were spam – a rise of 4% over Q1. But as software gets better at detecting spam, particularly malicious emails, criminals are moving into the social world.

A separate survey by Nexgate found that social spam rocketed by 355% in the first half of the year, meaning that one in 200 social media posts is spam. 5% of social media apps are also spam, according to the research.

In many ways this is a logical development – better spam detection technology and heightened awareness mean that email is less effective at getting through to the gullible. With social media it is easier to reach a mass audience with a single tweet or post, and if you can unwittingly persuade people to share it, peer recommendation helps spread it even further and faster.

Essentially people need to apply the same levels of suspicion to social media as they do to other channels such as email – if it sounds too good to be true it probably is. And they also need to be careful what they say online. Cyber criminals are becoming increasingly sophisticated, harvesting information from social media (such as your children’s names or favourite football team) and using those to crack banking passwords. While this takes a lot longer than whacking out an email telling you your PayPal account has been limited, the rewards are potentially much greater, and there are plenty of people with the time and technology to build up enough of a profile to access your details.

So what should people be doing about it – and how can marketers make sure that their valuable and targeted communications reach the right audience and their brands don’t get hijacked? A lot of it is common sense. Don’t connect to people that you don’t know without checking them out and be careful what you share (and with whom). It is the 21st century equivalent of not leaving your wallet unattended or giving your address to strangers. Make sure you understand your privacy settings and bear in mind the default is normally set to open.

For marketers, there’s a double problem. Firstly, they need to increase engagement with target audiences so that their emails make it through spam filters in the first place (and even more importantly aren’t then deleted unread) and that they use the data available around the web to deliver insight into what customers want, without being accused of cyberstalking. And secondly, they need to protect their own brand against being hacked, particularly on social media. Who has the login details of your Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn pages and are they regularly changed? What is your social media policy – and how do you ensure that all your staff protect their passwords when it comes to business networks such as LinkedIn? All it takes is one person at a multinational company to be hacked and their account used to send spam and your reputation is in serious trouble.

So, the moral of the story is, be vigilant and remember that your online presence is now responsible for the majority of your personal or corporate brand reputation. Protect it on social media like your wallet in real life or you’ll suffer the consequences.

 

 

 

 

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October 2, 2013 - Posted by | Marketing, Social Media | , , , , , , , ,

1 Comment »

  1. […] Spam goes social […]

    Pingback by Fons Tuinstra's home » How Google changed my email box | October 4, 2013 | Reply


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