Revolutionary Measures

Not the Internet of Fridges

There’s nothing as embarrassing as a politician trying to explain complex technology and completely missing the point. And as IT is increasingly seen as ‘cool’ and therefore something they want to be associated with, you can see a growing number of our elected leaders showing their ignorance in public. Following George Osborne’s cringeworthy appearance in the Year of Code video, and David Cameron’s attempted hijacking of Silicon Roundabout, the PM is at it again.

Defunct refrigerators on curb with decorations...

Speaking at CeBIT in Germany this week Cameron started off well, lauding the potential of the Internet of Things, praising the innovation of UK companies such as ARM and Neul, talking about Anglo-German co-operation and doubling funding for the area. But then what example did he trot out to show what it means to the general public? That our fridges can talk to each other, and order a pint of milk when we’re running low. Hardly a New Industrial Revolution.

The internet enabled fridge has been around as long as I’ve been in PR (nearly 20 years) and despite regular press appearances (and some actual products), it has failed to take off. Primarily because it is a stupid idea. Most of us (apart from one of my old housemates), can see when they are running low on food/milk and visit the shops accordingly. If not, are supermarkets expected to drop everything and rush you a single pint of semi-skimmed because your fridge told them to? Hardly economically viable. And what happens if you bought something and didn’t like it – will your fridge keep ordering more until your house is full of Dairylea cheese triangles? How will privacy be managed? Will the device send your eating habits direct to FMCG companies, like a giant ClubCard? What about security?

Poking fun at ill-advised politicians is easy, but the danger with the fridge fixation is it masks the real benefits of the Internet of Things and paints the wrong picture to the general population. We are talking about the ability to monitor our health, reduce the need for hospital stays as patients can be treated in their own homes, better manage our energy use, save us money and create smart cities that share information to make our travel and lives easier and more fulfilling. It is probably true to say that the real innovations of the Internet of Things haven’t even been thought of yet – but will develop on the platform once it becomes prevalent.

Due to the combination of the UK’s existing strengths in low power chip design, Bluetooth, availability of radio spectrum and the efforts of pioneers in the smart home space, there is a real chance that the country (and Cambridge) can become a major player in the Internet of Things. And given that the sector is expected to be worth £8.7 trillion globally when it hits maturity (according to Cisco), it is definitely the right market to target.

To succeed, UK companies need support, a well-defined technology plan that maximises investment in the right areas and a long term vision, rather than lazy examples of machines that no-one wants that will put people off the entire concept, raise potential privacy concerns and stifle acceptance. Install an internet-enabled fridge in Number 10 by all means, but do a better job of explaining the bigger benefits to the wider population if you want the Internet of Things to really take off.

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March 12, 2014 - Posted by | Cambridge, PR, Startup

2 Comments »

  1. […] moving beyond the original web, to a more mobile, wearable and all-encompassing version, with the Internet of Things allowing previously dumb machines to communicate in real-time in order to improve our lives. The […]

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  2. […] of company, depending on the maturity of the market they are in. Emerging sectors, such as the Internet of Things, change fast, so a company needs to be flexible and focused, with the ability to pivot quickly and […]

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