Revolutionary Measures

Can social media help politicians engage?

Politicians have an image problem. In the main they are seen as aloof, out of touch and not particularly interested in their constituents except around election time. This lack of connection goes a long way to explaining the appeal of non-traditional parties such as UKIP, the Greens and even the Scottish Nationalists at the last election. Voters are bored with hearing the same platitudes mouthed by interchangeable MPs who think less about the long term, and more about their career. Of course, there are plenty of honourable exceptions, and, even in the case of Lord Sewel those that try and liven up the image of politicians by snorting cocaine from the breasts of prostitutes.

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However, a better long term strategy for building the right sort of relationships is staring politicians in the face – social media. By providing the chance to listen, engage and be themselves, it should enable them to build stronger ties to their constituents and consequently change attitudes. You only need to look at how Barack Obama mobilised voters in two presidential elections to see how powerful social media can be.

Unfortunately, many MPs are still either not using Twitter, or if they are, simply RT the party line or delegate it to their interns. It is time for this to change, and any MPs worried about doing an Ed Balls should read this excellent guide for MPs to using Twitter. Written by Stuart Bruce for the Chartered Institute of Public Relations it was submitted to the Speaker’s Commission for Digital Democracy.

But it isn’t just MPs that should take a look. Reading through it I was struck by how relevant the best practice it contains is to anyone in business who is tweeting or thinking about taking the plunge.

Some of the key points I’d highlight are:

  1. Twitter isn’t just for the young. The fastest growing group of users is those between 55 and 64. So, whatever your customer demographic you should investigate joining the network
  2. Use it to talk, not to broadcast. Twitter works best if you spend time listening and joining/starting conversations, rather than simply pumping out your point of view
  3. There is no such thing as ‘in a personal capacity’. We’ve all seen the caveats that tweets are personal and don’t show any endorsement or company backing. But in reality politicians will be judged by what is tweeted in their name, and if you provide your company name then it will be too. So if you want to be wild and outrageous (but legal), get yourself a second Twitter account (or save it for Facebook).
  4. Be human. This goes back to talking, not shouting. Use humour and vary what you say, but do remember that spoken irony doesn’t necessarily translate on screen.
  5. The 60 second rule. If you just learn one thing from the guide it’s this. If you think your tweet is potentially contentious wait a minute, go back to it and take another look before you press send. And don’t tweet while drunk.
  6. Your account is never hacked. The standard political argument for when a dubious tweet appears is that someone has taken the time to break into your account and tweet in your name. No-one believes this anymore – so obey the 60 second rule and you shouldn’t have a problem
  7. Use Twitter to find information – look for specific hashtags, follow relevant people and news sources and it will ensure you are better informed. You can also use it to build relationships with new business prospects, but do bear in mind there’s a fine line between proactive sales outreach and stalking.
  8. For politicians and their wives, I’d add an eighth point – never conduct your marital break-up over social media, but I can’t imagine many people think this is a good idea at the best of times….

So for anyone in business who isn’t on Twitter, or even those that are, but aren’t using it to its full potential take a look at the guide and see what you can apply to your own tweeting – it may not get you elected, but it will help you engage with the right audiences and build stronger relationships.

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July 29, 2015 - Posted by | Creative, Marketing, PR, Social Media

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