Revolutionary Measures

The perils of celebrity endorsement

English: Stephen Hawking giving a lecture for ...

English: Stephen Hawking giving a lecture for NASA’s 50th anniversary (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Intel must have thought it was onto a winner. Invest in building a new system to help Professor Stephen Hawking to speak, and not only does it get lots of media coverage (to help a good cause of course), but it also put one over on arch rival ARM by linking itself with Cambridge’s most famous living scientist.

Unfortunately, it hasn’t quite turned out like that. Headlines are dominated by Professor Hawking airing his worries that mankind will be threatened by the rise of artificial intelligence, with the machines (which Intel obviously makes the chips for) posing a threat to our very existence.

It isn’t the first time a big brand has been caught out by its chosen celebrity undermining its carefully thought out plans. Here’s another five that a quick Google search turned up:

1. Samsung and LeBron James
American basketball player LeBron James was unveiled as the face of the Samsung Galaxy Note III phone amid much fa

nfare. All was going well until he tweeted to his 12 million followers that his phone had just erased all his data and rebooted itself – hardly the message of reliability that Samsung was looking for.

2. Motorola and David Beckham
Another classic issue is a celebrity being caught using a competitor’s product. Sticking with sports stars, footballer Ronaldinho signed a lucrative deal with Coke – and was then caught on camera sipping from a can of Pepsi at a press conference. Not to be outdone, David Beckham lent his celebrity status to Motorola’s £14,000 Aura mobile phone, only to be snapped by paparazzi with an iPhone in his hand. He later claimed he’d been ‘holding it for a friend’.

3. Microsoft and Oprah Winfrey
At least Becks had an attempt at an excuse, unlike Oprah Winfrey. Paid to endorse Microsoft’s Surface tablet, she sent out a tweet extolling its virtues. Trouble was every tweet has the program and platform it was sent from automatically added on the bottom. So “Gotta say love that SURFACE!” was appended by the unfortunate words “sent via Twitter for iPad.”

4. Bacardi and Vinnie Jones
Ex-footballer and professional hardman Vinnie Jones was always a risky choice for an alcohol brand, as Bacardi found out to its cost. After using him as the face of the rum, he had to be hastily removed after he was convicted of a drunken assault on a flight from Heathrow to Tokyo. On a similar, but less dramatic note, car insurer Churchill dropped actor Martin Clunes after he lost his driving licence for speeding. Clunes may have complained, but he should have done his homework – previous star of the ads Vic Reeves was sacked after losing his licence for drink driving.

5. Yardley and Helena Bonham Carter
Perhaps the best example of a brand not doing its homework (and for sheer star insouciance) comes from actress Helena Bonham Carter. Chosen as the face of Yardley cosmetics she admitted in an interview that she rarely wore makeup and couldn’t understand why the brand had chosen her. The deal ended soon after.

All of this puts Professor Hawking (and Intel) in rather exalted company – demonstrating the perils of the celebrity endorsement, no matter how highbrow the name involved actually is.

December 3, 2014 Posted by | Cambridge, Creative, Marketing, PR | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lego – the marketing

English: A 2x4 red plastic brick like a Lego b...

Everyone loves Lego – except of course when you tread on a brick with your bare feet or cannot see the living room floor for brightly coloured ‘creations’. So it is a bit of a surprise that we’re only just seeing the first full-length Lego movie (imaginatively titled The Lego Movie) hitting UK cinemas now. We’ve already had short Lego films, pastiches of other films (my personal favourite is the Camelot song from Monty Python’s Quest for the Holy Grail) and innumerable video games.

As a parent of Lego-age children I’m sure I’ll be visiting the cinema to see it this half term, but what has really impressed me is the marketing around the film. As well as the traditional online, cinema and print ads, Warner Brothers have looked further afield. For example, the whole of one ad break in Dancing on Ice was made up of traditional adverts, re-shot entirely using Lego characters and bricks. From BT to Travelodge, it didn’t really matter how good the original ads were – the Lego ones were a whole lot better.

It didn’t end there – the Culture Show ran a special programme on the impact of Lego on architecture and even David Beckham got in on the act, claiming that building with the stuff calms him down and that he’d just finished a 1,000 brick model of Tower Bridge. VIP tickets for David and his kids must be in the post. At one point I even expected a Lego character to turn up as Top Gear’s Star in a Reasonably Priced Car (or the Stig to remove his helmet to reveal a yellow, brick-like face.)

And this has been backed up by a very active social media strategy, dating back a number of months. This sends you to a website where you can create your own mini figure which you can turn into a poster, icon or wallpaper.

Of course, Lego the Movie (and indeed the overall brand) has a big advantage over a lot of its competitors. It is intrinsically linked to pretty much everyone’s childhoods, and the urge to create is something that most of us don’t grow out of. However the company has used its strengths and extended itself very naturally to the film and online spaces (witness its CUUSOO site where the community votes on potential new models). Consequently people have flocked to the movie and a sequel is already in the works.

We can’t all have the brand power of Lego, but brand marketers and startups alike can learn a lot from how the company operates. It is open, friendly and inclusive, great at customer service and most importantly, doesn’t rest on its laurels. There is always new stuff coming out – from electronics-based Mindstorms to more traditional models. Children and adults love the Lego experience and have an emotional connection with the brand that grows over time. You don’t really grow out of it. Look at your own company – how can you build your own little bit of Lego into the DNA? Minus the painful standing on a brick, obviously.

Enhanced by Zemanta

February 12, 2014 Posted by | Creative, Marketing, Social Media | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2018 World Cup – the digital dimension

So after what feels like years of campaigning, the hosts for the 2018 football World Cup will be announced this afternoon in Zurich.

Given that voting rests with the 22 men of the FIFA Executive Committee, you’d think that wide-scale marketing doesn’t have a large part to play in bid success or failure. But aside from glad-handing the FIFA dignitaries on a one-to-one basis, building a long-term marketing campaign that reflects brand values is going to be essential to the winner.

Witness the incredible effort that has gone into the digital side of the England bid. Designed to provide an opportunity for fans around the world to show their support and interact with the bid, it is integral to the bid premise “England United, the World Invited”. I’d say the stats alone show it has done an amazing job – over 300,000 fans from 170 countries have joined its Facebook group, 2.2 million have registered their support and 6,000 follow the bid on Twitter. And that’s ignoring the downloadable iPhone app, wallpapers, YouTube channel et al.

It really delivers on the key aim of showing FIFA the depth of support for England’s bid both at home and around the world. Let’s hope that at 3pm today, all England’s efforts, on- and offline, will be rewarded…………

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

December 2, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment