Revolutionary Measures

A Royal PR car crash?

There’s nothing like a royal story to get the press excited, and the Duke of Edinburgh’s recent car crash is no exception. It even kept Brexit off the front pages for a few days, providing a welcome bit of relief for everyone, particularly Theresa May.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

While the actual circumstances of the accident, which saw the 97 year old’s Land Rover flip over, are the subject of a police investigation, that hasn’t stopped the media analysing the situation in meticulous detail. It is a perfect opportunity – the crash site outside Sandringham is easily accessible to journalists, there are plenty of local witnesses to the aftermath and the injured occupants of the other car involved are clearly upset about their treatment and want to state their case. To top it all, the Royal Family hasn’t helped its cause – Philip was back driving a (new) Land Rover on the Sandringham estate just a couple of days after the crash, without wearing a seatbelt. And the Queen was then spotted in the back of another car without a seatbelt on her way to church.

Amidst all the furore and discussions about whether the Palace has apologised to those in the other car, the whole case is in stark contrast to the generally successful public image projected by the younger royals. Indeed, Prince William is busy interviewing Sir David Attenborough at Davos on saving the planet, while Prince Harry has launched the Invictus Games, openly discussed mental health and married a smart Hollywood actress. PR guru Mark Borkowski described the Royal Household’s response to the Duke’s accident as “DIY PR”.

But is it actually that bad? Clearly there isn’t much of a media relations strategy going on at all, but that’s unsurprising for three reasons:

1.The Duke of Edinburgh doesn’t give a damn about his public perception

In fact, he’s always delighted in being rude and not caring what people say. So any crisis PR team would have their work cut out getting their client to recognise there is an issue, let alone deal with it.

2. There’s a police investigation going on

As with any traffic accident, the police are looking into the circumstances and deciding next steps. So any admission of guilt to the injured parties would be prejudicial to the Duke’s case in any investigation. Not to mention that insurers always counsel never to admit to anything to avoid it being taken as declaring guilt.

3. No-one was expecting the Spanish Inquisition

It feels like the Royal Household thought this was a minor story that would blow over quickly. Hence not seeing driving a new car two days later as being a trifle soon. I think they also counted on public sympathy for Philip – he’s had health problems over the last year, and being independent enough to drive himself around at 97 is quite a feat.

What they didn’t understand is that the news agenda was waiting for this type of storm in a teacup story. As I said it is a change from Brexit and allows monarchists, anti-royalists and those in between to all give their opinions. A quick scan of the headlines backs this up – The Guardian has “Prince Philip’s crash should mark a turning point in our royal sycophancy”, The Independent has “Prince Philip has every right to drive at 97” and the Daily Express has “Diana caused Prince Philip crash.” While I may have made the last one up, it gives a flavour of the coverage to date – which shows no real signs of stopping.

Does this mean the Duke needs to take PR lessons from his grandchildren? Not in the least. Whatever your views on the Royal Family, and the Duke of Edinburgh himself, he’s being himself – and in many ways any negative coverage he gets acts as a lightning rod for the monarchy as a whole, making the rest of them look better. So less a PR car crash, and more an example of why you need a range of personalities within your organisation in order to appeal to everyone.

January 23, 2019 Posted by | Marketing, PR | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2018 World Cup – the digital dimension

So after what feels like years of campaigning, the hosts for the 2018 football World Cup will be announced this afternoon in Zurich.

Given that voting rests with the 22 men of the FIFA Executive Committee, you’d think that wide-scale marketing doesn’t have a large part to play in bid success or failure. But aside from glad-handing the FIFA dignitaries on a one-to-one basis, building a long-term marketing campaign that reflects brand values is going to be essential to the winner.

Witness the incredible effort that has gone into the digital side of the England bid. Designed to provide an opportunity for fans around the world to show their support and interact with the bid, it is integral to the bid premise “England United, the World Invited”. I’d say the stats alone show it has done an amazing job – over 300,000 fans from 170 countries have joined its Facebook group, 2.2 million have registered their support and 6,000 follow the bid on Twitter. And that’s ignoring the downloadable iPhone app, wallpapers, YouTube channel et al.

It really delivers on the key aim of showing FIFA the depth of support for England’s bid both at home and around the world. Let’s hope that at 3pm today, all England’s efforts, on- and offline, will be rewarded…………

 

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December 2, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment