Revolutionary Measures

Will Artificial Intelligence kill creativity?

Listening to the news recently, one of Microsoft’s Artificial Intelligence (AI) researchers was extolling the virtues of the technology, and how it could help humans. Many of the examples mentioned – such as using machine learning to analyse millions of medical cases to alert doctors to symptoms they might have missed and describing the world around them to the blind, all have a clear benefit to society, as does the ability to understand conversations and use the knowledge to improve customer experience.

Artificial Intelligence Programming Robot Ai Ki

However, the interview then turned to how AI is being incorporated into Microsoft Office, where it will be used to help ‘improve’ the documents that we write, and the presentations that we create. And that’s where I began to get worried. Everyone has a personal style when it comes to writing, and while some mistakes are obvious (such as spelling and punctuation), ‘correcting’ what we write so that it fits with what is seen as good by an algorithm worries me a lot. I do a lot of writing for clients and each one has its own, individual style, dependent on who it is aimed at, the message I’m trying to get across and the medium being used. How can a machine understand this? I’ve already switched off the grammar checker on Word as it always seems to recommend using shorter words and shorter sentences, even if they don’t give the impact I’m looking for.

It also made me think of the impact on overall creativity. Through the ages writers have developed their own unique styles, often going against the current orthodoxy to stand out from the crowd. Imagine e.e. cummings poems with all the words capitalised, or Marcel Proust sentences shortened so that they don’t stretch over multiple pages. Or the fact that computers don’t seem to yet understand puns and double entendres, removing the humour from documents.

In short, the risk is that we end up with bland, homogeneous copy produced by everyone. It may be understandable by a 10 year old, and meet all SEO requirements but it doesn’t have real impact, and the good doesn’t stand out from the average. To my mind that doesn’t help anyone – amidst all the worries about AI and robots taking over the world, I think we need to start with its effect on creativity. Perhaps it is time to go back to pen and paper?

Photo via Max Pixel http://maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com/Artificial-Intelligence-Programming-Robot-Ai-Ki-2167835

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July 19, 2017 Posted by | Creative, Marketing | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Write more, type less

According to research quoted by Richard Branson, half of 13-19 year olds have never written a thank you letter, and just 10% own a pen. And before we adults start moaning about teenagers, texting and social media replacing good old fashioned ink and paper, think back to the last time you hand wrote something, other than your name on a Christmas card.

Image of a modern fountain pen writing in curs...

As Branson points out, the act of writing long hand holds more meaning than an email or electronic message. You have to put greater physical effort into it, and you also need to think about it more, plan it and take time to actually write the sentences, particularly if your handwriting is as atrocious as mine. He points out that poems and love letters, no matter how scribbled, are the perfect way to crystallise feelings and emotions directly, rather than through the medium of a keyboard and screen. You can’t cut and paste sections of text, move things round or delete words without leaving a mess. Obviously this does involve more time, but that isn’t always a bad thing – particularly given the breakneck speed of modern life.

Writing shouldn’t just be about letters either. I find that physically taking notes is the best way of ensuring I actually remember what I’m hearing, particularly if I then type it out again later on. And planning in longhand is the perfect way of collecting your thoughts before drafting a press release or document and avoids starting with the soul destroying white space of an empty Word document.

The scary thing is that we are becoming physically less able and practiced at holding a pen. As a student I wrote for three hours straight in exams, without any ill effects, yet now I struggle to manage more than a single holiday postcard without getting cramp. Children today increasingly don’t need to write, with much of their coursework completed online, so no wonder that they don’t need to own a pen.

What we need is to embrace the best of both worlds – you need the skills to type quickly and organise your thoughts using modern technology, but also to take a step back, breathe and think about what you are trying to say. The pen is perfect for this – we should all remember to uses digits in the offline world, as well as the digital one. So, if you don’t have one, put a pen and notebook on your Christmas list and make a New Year’s Resolution to write more and type less.

This is my last blog of 2015, so thanks to everyone that has read, commented and shared my posts. Have a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

December 16, 2015 Posted by | Creative, Marketing, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment